Sea cadets take on 500-mile rowathon challenge

OARSOME: Sea cadets take part in the sponsored row

SEA Cadets from Bournemouth took on the challenge of a 500-mile rowathon to raise funds for a new boat.

Youngsters had to complete a minimum of five miles on rowing machines at Winton Arts and Media College sports hall, raising funds towards £2,600 to buy a yole, a hybrid sail-rowing boat.

The cadets hit their target distance and raised £850 towards the cause, with more fundraising events planned in future.

Rowing coach Ellis Hagger, who is also president of the Bournemouth Surf Boat Club, said the yole would allow the sea cadets, based in Gloucester Road in Boscombe, to make more river trips.

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De tempo em tempo, mulheres sentem a necessidade de viajar entre elas, curtindo atividades femininas, cuidando da mente e do corpo e vivendo novas experiências. Confira os melhores destinos para viajar com amigas, nesta seleção feita pelo site Condé Nast.

Surf Goddess Retreat, Indonésia
Com o paradisíaco litoral da ilha de Bali como pano de fundo, o Surf Goddess Retreat é um hotel-boutique voltado para o público feminino onde as mulheres alternam aulas de surfe com sessões de ioga e tratamentos no spa. Pacotes de sete dias a partir de R$ 5 mil.

Andar Chopard, Jumeirah Emirates Tower, Emirados Árabes Unidos
Homens não estão autorizados a pisar no 40º andar do exclusivo Jumeirah Emirates Tower de Dubai. Exclusivo para mulheres, o piso Chopard tem quartos elegantes com decorações femininas e arranjos florai, salão de ioga e produtos de beleza Chopard. Diárias a partir de R$ 520.

Programa de vínculo feminino, Lake Austin Spa Resort, Estados Unidos
Situado no estado do Texas Lake Austin Spa Resort oferece uma oportunidade única de que mães e filhas vivam momentos juntas, recebendo massagens e mais de cem tratamentos para a mente e o corpo. Além de cuidados tradicionais como manicure e pedicure, as hóspedes são paparicadas com tratamentos diferentes como acupuntura japonesa e massagem com bambu. Mães e filhas também podem aproveitar aulas de cozinha, cursos práticos de jardinagem e muito mais. Pacotes de três noites a partir de R$ 3.400 por pessoa.

Acampamento cowgirl Alisal Guest Ranch, Estados Unidos
Mulheres podem curtir a verdadeira experiência de dias de cowgirl sem perder o conforto no Alisal Guest Ranch, situado no estado da Califórnia.  Lá, as mulheres aprendem a colar a sela nos cavalos, juntar o gado e explorar numerosas trilhas, parando para descansar em agradáveis piqueniques e aproveitando degustações de vinhos. Pacotes de três noites a partir de R$ 3.800.

Chá e moda, Le Bristol, França
Mítico hotel de Paris, o Le Bristol é o lugar perfeito para curtir o glamour da cidade francesa com deliciosas pastelarias e muita moda. Todo mês, o hotel oferece sessões para tomar o chá da tarde observando as novas criações.  Diárias a partir de R$ 2 mil.

Oficina de chocolate, The Chocolate Boutique Hotel, Inglaterra
Hotel temático voltado para o mundo do chocolate, o The Chocolate Boutique Hotel delicia seus visitantes com diferentes tipos do produto, sessão de degustação e oficinas para aprender tudo sobre sua história e seu processo de fabricação.  Situado em Bournemouth, o hotel tem diárias a partir de R$ 250.

Suíte Diane von Furstenberg, Hayman Island Resort, Austrália
Situado numa ilha particular da Grande Barreira de Coral, o Hayman Island Resort tem muito conforto e luxo para aproveitar as maravilhas naturais da região. Criado pela famosa designer Diane von Furstenberg, o penthouse do resort tem serviço de mordomo, sofisticada decoração e amenidades para cuidar da pele. Diárias a partir de R$ 5 mil.

Matthew Wood
AUSSIE expats will occasionally think fondly of their homeland, dreaming of the sun and the surf and planning visits to some of those world renowned spots, once taken for granted. Now conductor Matthew Wood will return home to do just that, in a most unique fashion.

This month, Wood heads to Australia to prepare to conduct the Darwin Symphony Orchestra (DSO) in the first ever symphonic concert at Australia’s most iconic landmark, Uluru.

“Part of [the DSO’s] ambition is to take the majesty of a symphony orchestra to places that would never usually have access to this art form,” explains Wood.

“It is tremendously exciting and is representative of everything we are about and what we wish to achieve.”

Wood returns to Australia to take up the post of Chief Conductor and Artistic Director of the DSO. Wood currently lives in London and is soon to wrap up his work with the Royal Ballet in La Bayadère.

Wood first made the decision to move to the UK in 2005 when he was offered the position of Conducting Fellow at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester. He then worked with as Associate Conductor with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, followed by freelance work throughout the UK, Europe and Australia.

“The last few years of freelancing have been quite amazing, but what I started to miss was a sense of belonging,” says Wood.

“I always intended to return to Australia at some stage – it was just a question of ‘what for?’

“Then this position opened with the DSO. I came and met all the wonderful people who make up this orchestra and my question was answered.”

Wood claims he was struck by the vibrancy and enthusiasm of the orchestra, as well as the people of Darwin. He concedes that delivering classical music to the people of the NT will be a huge challenge, being a state six times the size of the United Kingdom.

Darwin is growing rapidly and with it, its cultural diversity. The orchestra is already a central part of the community,” Wood explains.

“With this, however, comes a responsibility to remain relevant. Our goal is not just to present classical symphonic programmes, but to be representative of the diversity that surrounds us.”

Darwin Symphony Orchestra

The majestic red rock will serve as a backdrop to the evening concert in October, with what Wood describes as a diverse programme, ranging from music inspired by Australian indigenous culture through to Romantic Italian opera.

Joining the orchestra will be Opera Australia’s lyric soprano, Emma Matthews, and William Barton on the didgeridoo.

“My aim is not just to improve the orchestra and to develop its playing and quality, but to make the orchestra emblematic of the Territory and what it stands for,” he adds.

“I look forward to the challenges and excitement of bringing classical music to the people of the NT and beyond.”

The Uluru DSO concert will take place 18 and 19 October and is described by the group as a “once in a lifetime opportunity”.

The conditions were perfect and the beach was packed with spectators hoping to witness fantastic surfing. Having both great weather and waves for the finals was an added bonus for all the top surfers in the country who entered the event.

Russell Winter, two-times UK Pro Surf Tour champion, took the Sundried Open National title and was followed by Gordon Fontaine, from Bournemouth. Third place went to an inform Newquay surfer Mark Harris and fourth to Louis Eyre.

The English National Surf Championship is one of Europe’s longest running surfing competitions, where some of the best surfers in the country compete for the title of English Champion and selection to the English team for the European Surfing Championships.

In the other divisions there were many standout performances. Keshia Eyre won the Disco Beads Women’s division in decisive fashion. In the Zumbatastic Men’s Longboard, a world class performance was put in by Ben Skinner as he dominated over his fellow competitors in the final.  The Zumbatastic Women’s final was taken out by Charlotte Bayliss.

The Senior and Veteran divisions were won by two Newquay Lifeguards, James Mitchell and Mark Oliver, the Masters by South Devon based Martin Connelly. This year’s Randall Davies Trophy went to the event Head Judge Mike Durkin for all the work he has put in over the last year.

2013 English National Surf Championships:

Open:
1. Russell Winter
2. Gordon Fontaine
3. Mark Harris
4. Luis Eyre

Womens:
1. Keshia Eyre
2. Emily Currie
3. Gabi Rowe
4. Hannah Harding

Longboard:
1. Ben Skinner
2. Adam Griffiths
3. Ben Haworth
4. Zack Lawton

Seniors:
1. James Mitchell
2. Sean Harris
3. Paul Kirby
4. Martin Connolly
5. Matt Harwood



chocolate shoe

The chic and unique Chocolate Boutique Hotel in Bournemouth has been named one of best ‘girliest hotel getaways’ in the world by CNN Travel.

In a round-up of seven ‘quintessential girls’ getaways’ published this month, the travel website describes the deliciously different hotel and its chocolate shoe making workshops as ‘double whammy heaven’.

“There are daily chocolate deliveries and themed rooms like “The Cocoa Bean” and the “Chocolate Truffle Suite” as well as a variety of events including tastings, bean-to-bar workshops and even a chocolate shoe moulding class,” runs the report. “Who can resist?”

Other top girlie getaways included in the CNN round-up are Surf Goddess Retreats in Indonesia, Chopard Ladies Floor at the Jumeirah Emirates Towers in the United Arab Emirates and female bonding programmes at the Lake Austin Spa Resort in the United States.

Also mentioned are cowgirl boot camps at the Alisal Guest Ranch and Resort in the United States, high tea and high fashion at Hotel le Bristol in Paris and the Diane von Furstenberg-designed suite at the Hayman Island Resort in Australia.

In its write-up, CNN Travel said hoteliers across the globe had finally heeded the demand for exclusively female experiences thanks to the recent rise of ladies-only gyms, taxis and subway cars.

“Today’s offerings ranging from cowgirl romps to teatime fashion shows, the hotel industry finally acknowledging that women desire holidays that provide not only safety, but also glamour and excitement,” it said.

“Girly hotel stays are no longer limited to cutesy pastel-colored rooms and run of the mill spa treatments.”

Chocolatier Gerry Wilton, who founded the unique chocolate themed hotel with his wife Roo and daughters Leoni and Polly, said they were delighted to have been featured in the round-up.

“CNN Travel lists the world’s best travel, entertainment and lifestyle experiences so it’s a privilege to be included,” he said.

Last month, the Chocolate Boutique Hotel unveiled its new chocolate sleepovers, which are already proving very popular with hen parties. At chocolate sleepovers, guests can paint their portrait in chocolate, take part in a chocolate and wine tasting and sip chocolate cocktails before nestling down for sweet dreams in a chocolate themed room. They can even have a midnight feast.

To find out more about the Chocolate Boutique Hotel, also named one of the best six novelty hotels in the world by The Sunday Times Travel Magazine, ring 01202 556857 or go to www.thechocolateboutiquehotel.co.uk

The CNN report (http://travel.cnn.com/7-worlds-girliest-hotel-getaways-06709…) was compiled by Kristen McKenzie, who heads up HotelsCombined.com’s team of hotel experts and specializes in hospitality industry trends. The hotel search site compares prices and data from hundreds of travel sites with a database of 350,000+ hotels.

ENDS

Note to editors:

About Gerry Wilton/Chocolate Delight/The Chocolate Boutique Hotel

Founded in 2004 by the Wilton family, Chocolate Delight was one of the first companies to have a commercial chocolate fountain in the UK and quickly established itself as the leading chocolate fountain hire company. It was soon called on by corporates, event companies and celebrities to provide fountains for functions such as film premieres and weddings, including Peter and Jordan’s. In 2006, the Wilton family saw the opportunity to expand and bought a beautiful but outdated 19th century grade II listed hotel in Bournemouth. Christmas 2007 saw the renovation of the building and it became The Chocolate Boutique Hotel, the world’s first chocolate themed hotel. Today, Chocolate Delight is one of the most successful UK chocolate companies in its field and holds Chocolate Workshops at venues nationwide. Its Corporate Chocolate Teambuilding events commenced late in 2005 and are now run all over the UK and more recently in Europe.

For further information, please contact:

Tracey Williams, PR Consultant to Chocolate Delight/The Chocolate Boutique Hotel
Tel: 01637 871586
Email: tracey.williams@twpr.co.uk

This press release was distributed by SourceWire News Distribution on behalf of TWPR in the following categories:
Travel, Women’s Interest, Food Drink.
For more information visit http://www.dwpub.com/sourcewire

chocolate shoe

The chic and unique Chocolate Boutique Hotel in Bournemouth has been named one of best ‘girliest hotel getaways’ in the world by CNN Travel.

In a round-up of seven ‘quintessential girls’ getaways’ published this month, the travel website describes the deliciously different hotel and its chocolate shoe making workshops as ‘double whammy heaven’.

“There are daily chocolate deliveries and themed rooms like “The Cocoa Bean” and the “Chocolate Truffle Suite” as well as a variety of events including tastings, bean-to-bar workshops and even a chocolate shoe moulding class,” runs the report. “Who can resist?”

Other top girlie getaways included in the CNN round-up are Surf Goddess Retreats in Indonesia, Chopard Ladies Floor at the Jumeirah Emirates Towers in the United Arab Emirates and female bonding programmes at the Lake Austin Spa Resort in the United States.

Also mentioned are cowgirl boot camps at the Alisal Guest Ranch and Resort in the United States, high tea and high fashion at Hotel le Bristol in Paris and the Diane von Furstenberg-designed suite at the Hayman Island Resort in Australia.

In its write-up, CNN Travel said hoteliers across the globe had finally heeded the demand for exclusively female experiences thanks to the recent rise of ladies-only gyms, taxis and subway cars.

“Today’s offerings ranging from cowgirl romps to teatime fashion shows, the hotel industry finally acknowledging that women desire holidays that provide not only safety, but also glamour and excitement,” it said.

“Girly hotel stays are no longer limited to cutesy pastel-colored rooms and run of the mill spa treatments.”

Chocolatier Gerry Wilton, who founded the unique chocolate themed hotel with his wife Roo and daughters Leoni and Polly, said they were delighted to have been featured in the round-up.

“CNN Travel lists the world’s best travel, entertainment and lifestyle experiences so it’s a privilege to be included,” he said.

Last month, the Chocolate Boutique Hotel unveiled its new chocolate sleepovers, which are already proving very popular with hen parties. At chocolate sleepovers, guests can paint their portrait in chocolate, take part in a chocolate and wine tasting and sip chocolate cocktails before nestling down for sweet dreams in a chocolate themed room. They can even have a midnight feast.

To find out more about the Chocolate Boutique Hotel, also named one of the best six novelty hotels in the world by The Sunday Times Travel Magazine, ring 01202 556857 or go to www.thechocolateboutiquehotel.co.uk

The CNN report (http://travel.cnn.com/7-worlds-girliest-hotel-getaways-06709…) was compiled by Kristen McKenzie, who heads up HotelsCombined.com’s team of hotel experts and specializes in hospitality industry trends. The hotel search site compares prices and data from hundreds of travel sites with a database of 350,000+ hotels.

ENDS

Note to editors:

About Gerry Wilton/Chocolate Delight/The Chocolate Boutique Hotel

Founded in 2004 by the Wilton family, Chocolate Delight was one of the first companies to have a commercial chocolate fountain in the UK and quickly established itself as the leading chocolate fountain hire company. It was soon called on by corporates, event companies and celebrities to provide fountains for functions such as film premieres and weddings, including Peter and Jordan’s. In 2006, the Wilton family saw the opportunity to expand and bought a beautiful but outdated 19th century grade II listed hotel in Bournemouth. Christmas 2007 saw the renovation of the building and it became The Chocolate Boutique Hotel, the world’s first chocolate themed hotel. Today, Chocolate Delight is one of the most successful UK chocolate companies in its field and holds Chocolate Workshops at venues nationwide. Its Corporate Chocolate Teambuilding events commenced late in 2005 and are now run all over the UK and more recently in Europe.

For further information, please contact:

Tracey Williams, PR Consultant to Chocolate Delight/The Chocolate Boutique Hotel
Tel: 01637 871586
Email: tracey.williams@twpr.co.uk

This press release was distributed by SourceWire News Distribution on behalf of TWPR in the following categories:
Travel, Women’s Interest, Food Drink.
For more information visit http://www.sourcewire.com

AP

Six years ago, my boyfriend and I decided to sample it, starting part-way with a two-week hike along Cornwall’s shores, from Bude to Falmouth.

London – We were broken. As the pub chattered around us, we stared dumbly into pints we could barely summon the energy to lift. My burnt face smouldered; my shoulders throbbed at the memory of the hefty pack they’d borne all day. The bar was just metres away, but the effort demanded to get there was Herculean. I hobbled over for the next round.

“All right?” the barman asked as I flumped on to a stool. I considered this, perhaps more philosophically than he’d intended. My body was in tatters – and I had to do it all again tomorrow. And yet … actually, I’d never been better.

So ended my first day of walking the South West Coast Path (SWCP), the 1,014km National Trail – the longest of 15 in England and Wales – that has traced the rugged edges from Minehead in Somerset to Poole in Dorset since opening in 1978. From next week, the path is hosting a range of sponsored hikes to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the SWCP Association, the independent voluntary organisation that campaigns to improve and safeguard the path. About 70 per cent of the trail runs through national parks or protected areas, encompassing cliffs, coves, dunes, beaches, valleys, lighthouses, tumbling fishing villages and arty seaside towns.

Six years ago, my boyfriend and I decided to sample it, starting part-way with a two-week hike along Cornwall’s shores, from Bude to Falmouth – my first real attempt at independent multi-day walking. We’d set off full of fried breakfast and inexperience, toting bags far too heavy, but enthused by the challenge. We arrived in Boscastle – nine hours and 27 brutal but beauty-blessed kilometres later – realising we’d underestimated our task, but fallen unconditionally in love with it.

In hindsight, selecting Bude to Boscastle was quite a baptism. Here, the SWCP – which in total involves almost four Everests’ worth of ascent – is at its most undulating. I remember the most wonderful scenery, passing Dizzard’s dwarf forest, gazing out from rocky promontories and discovering smugglers’ coves. (The path was established in the 19th century so coastguards could patrol every cranny to keep out contraband.)

I also recall knee-twinging descents followed by sheer climbs. Yet, as the days passed, our limbs became trail hardened and we melted into a basic rhythm: wake, walk, eat, sleep. Although we often dipped into towns and harbours, the real world scarcely intruded. By the time we reached St Ives (day eight), we felt like professionals. We cooked fresh pollack on a camp stove and ate on a bench looking over the sea. The next morning, we hit the path with the rising sun. Looking out to the Carracks rocks, we gasped as a blob popped above the waves: a seal. Then another. A third appeared – or so we thought. No, this was a black triangle slicing the blue. It was a basking shark, the first of several that we’d see.

As we sipped our final pint in Falmouth at the end of the fortnight, I knew I had to complete it all. A few hardy souls yomp it in one six-week odyssey. We settled on four chunks over five years. Our second stage (though sequentially the trail’s first) was the North Devon section from Minehead to Bude. While the Cornish coast had felt mystical – laced with Arthurian legend, witchcraft, ruined mines and bootleggers’ bays – North Devon was high drama. The cliffs here are the SWCP’s highest, threaded with switchbacking paths through gorse. This time we had stronger legs and smaller backpacks. Still, it was a test: villages such as Lynmouth and Clovelly are so appealing precisely because they squeeze into deep, narrow clefts. And the final day, from Hartland Point to Bude, was a wild, wave-clattered geological roller coaster. It’s generally considered the toughest part, and we had quite a day for it. The mist hung thick below us as we walked, the sea a raging, invisible beast. Whenever the trail plunged down, we dipped into a fearsome world of white water crashing on razor rocks that cut through the surf like dragons’ tails. This was the path at its rawest.

It was on this section that we met a man going the other way … all the way from Land’s End to John O’Groats; a trip, he reckoned, of some 70 or 80 days. It was quite something to contemplate – to remove yourself from the everyday activity of the rest of the world, instead setting muscle and mind to the simple task of moving forwards. That’s the lure of long-distance walking – the joy of what you can absorb when all other complications are filtered out.

I still had plenty of SWCP to finish first, though. Section three was a softer beast. There was still plenty of climbing on the route from Falmouth to Exmouth, and plenty of wild shores, but it seemed much more civilised. Here, the path is more frequently interrupted by fishing harbours and seaside honeypots, some cute (Polperro, Fowey, Noss Mayo), some less so (Par, Brixham, Paignton). It was also incised by several waterways. Although, as “veterans”, we’d packed waterproof trousers, our planning still wasn’t perfect. Reliable ferries took us across the genteel harbours of Dartmouth and Salcombe, and from stately Mount Edgcumbe into the bustle of Plymouth. But we only just caught boatman Billy in time for a lift across the Yealm, and had to book a taxi to detour around the inconvenient Erme estuary.

Three-quarters done, I reflected on the trail so far. Friends wanted to know which were the best bits, greatest views, finest clifftops. But having met walkers along the way, we never heard the same SWCP favourites. Votes had been cast for Lamorna Cove and the lighthouse at Start Point; for the view back to Gurnard’s Head and the secluded beach at Porth Joke; for the Valley of the Rocks and swanky Salcombe. I had my own opinions, of course – influenced by mood, weather and quality of cream tea. But then, perhaps, the best was still to come.

So, finally, last year, we embarked on the last section, the Jurassic Coast from Exmouth to Poole. Having grown accustomed to the previous stages’ increased incursions by humanity, it was a surprise to find Dorset so contrastingly wild. Inland rolled bucolic green, but the county’s Channel-facing edges were a formidable barricade evidencing millennia of geological mastery: the fossil-flecked cliffs of Lyme Regis, glowing Golden Cap, the rock arch of Durdle Door. In places we felt like the first to set foot there since the Iron Age.

But while the landscape had taken a turn for the primitive, our comfort levels had not. Having mostly camped on previous stages, in Dorset we treated ourselves. A different BB full-stopped each day, reducing the size of our rucksacks, and making us more sanguine about the weather – rain is far less dispiriting if you know a warm bed and solid roof await.

To the end, the SWCP never failed to deliver. Indeed, our penultimate day – the 33km from Lulworth Cove to Swanage – was one of the best. Leaving Lulworth’s perfect scoop of a bay, we were soon traversing the military ranges: MoD ownership means access is limited, but also means the land is preserved in all its natural savagery. Seagulls were tossed by the wind as we fought along the clifftops and hauled up to the ancient hill-forts of Bindon and Flower’s Barrow; the surviving earthworks provided shelter and astonishing views. We passed paddlers at Kimmeridge Bay and watched volunteers fix dry-stone walls at the top of Houns Tout Cliff; struggling up to St Aldhelm’s Head, we even overtook some pirates – an incongruous stag do ooh-aaarring breathily up the stiff climb.

I like to think of somewhere like St Aldhelm’s – or maybe Cornwall’s Lizard, or Devon’s Hangman Hill – as a final Coast Path vision. The actual terminus is a slightly damp squib, the trail dribbling out on the sand of South Haven Point beside a monument that seems inadequate reward.

But then, the reward isn’t really about making that final mile. Whether it takes weeks, months, years or decades, it’s all about the journey.

Travel Essentials

To go counter-clockwise (Minehead to Poole) take a train to Taunton, then bus to Minehead (75mins). The end, South Haven Point, is a short ferry ride from Sandbanks/Poole Harbour; a bus connects to Bournemouth train station. Other places on the path with rail links include: Barnstaple, Newquay, St Ives, Penzance, Falmouth, Par, Looe, Plymouth, Exmouth and Weymouth (08457 48 49 50; nationalrail.co.uk).

Getting around

Buses link smaller hubs (travelinesw.com). The SWCP crosses many rivers and estuaries but not all ferries run all day or year-round. Luggage Transfers (luggagetransfers.co.uk) can deliver to stops on the SWCP from £6.50 (about R80) a bag for a two-bag transfer.

More information

South West Coast Path National Trail (southwestcoastpath.com). SWCP Association (southwestcoastpath.org.uk). Trailblazer (trailblazer-guides.com) has three excellent guides to the trail. – The Independent

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Jade Windley says her chances of earning a place in the main draw at Wimbledon this year are hanging in the balance.

The Lincolnshire tennis professional will have to play the qualifying tournament for the Wimbledon singles event.

  1. 5543296

    Jade Windley

But in the doubles, the former Horncastle Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School student is far closer to the 250 world ranking required to be given a place in the main draw.

Windley is hitting form at the right time this season. Last week the 23-year-old won a superb double in a $10,000 Futures event in Bournemouth, when she won both the singles event and the doubles tournament, along with doubles partner Anna Fitzpatrick.


Main image for BCS Ltd Turf

bcs

Contact: 01522 705130

Valid until: Saturday, July 27 2013

And, with a current world doubles ranking of 312, Windley hopes to continue climbing the ranking figures and close in on that 250 mark.

“It was great to win last week,” she said. “I won the event there last year, so it was really pleasing to defend my title.

“I think in the doubles this year it will be touch and go as to whether I am given a place in the main draw at Wimbledon.

“I just have to keep scoring points and try to get as close to that 250 mark as I possibly can.”

Windley steps up her efforts to climb the world rankings with a trip to South Africa this week.

The tournament in Johannesburg is a $50,000 hard court event and promises a tough test for Windley.

“I have never been to this one before, but there are ranking points available so it is important that I do the best I can,” Windley said.

“The more points I get, the more chance I have of going to Wimbledon without having to play through the qualifying tournament.

“The Wimbledon officials let you know a couple of weeks before the tournament.

“But if you are up or around the 250 mark you basically know you are in the ball park and you may get in.

“If you don’t make it, then you have to go through the qualifying event, which is tough in itself.”

Windley has recently returned to Lincolnshire and will make her home county her permanent base along with her coach Guy Galpin.

Galpin is taking up a role at Woodhall Spa Tennis Club and will be available for private coaching.

He can be contacted at guygalpin@aol.com or on 07590 599777.

Matthew Wood
AUSSIE expats will occasionally think fondly of their homeland, dreaming of the sun and the surf and planning visits to some of those world renowned spots, once taken for granted. Now conductor Matthew Wood will return home to do just that, in a most unique fashion.

This month, Wood heads to Australia to prepare to conduct the Darwin Symphony Orchestra (DSO) in the first ever symphonic concert at Australia’s most iconic landmark, Uluru.

“Part of [the DSO’s] ambition is to take the majesty of a symphony orchestra to places that would never usually have access to this art form,” explains Wood.

“It is tremendously exciting and is representative of everything we are about and what we wish to achieve.”

Wood returns to Australia to take up the post of Chief Conductor and Artistic Director of the DSO. Wood currently lives in London and is soon to wrap up his work with the Royal Ballet in La Bayadère.

Wood first made the decision to move to the UK in 2005 when he was offered the position of Conducting Fellow at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester. He then worked with as Associate Conductor with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, followed by freelance work throughout the UK, Europe and Australia.

“The last few years of freelancing have been quite amazing, but what I started to miss was a sense of belonging,” says Wood.

“I always intended to return to Australia at some stage – it was just a question of ‘what for?’

“Then this position opened with the DSO. I came and met all the wonderful people who make up this orchestra and my question was answered.”

Wood claims he was struck by the vibrancy and enthusiasm of the orchestra, as well as the people of Darwin. He concedes that delivering classical music to the people of the NT will be a huge challenge, being a state six times the size of the United Kingdom.

Darwin is growing rapidly and with it, its cultural diversity. The orchestra is already a central part of the community,” Wood explains.

“With this, however, comes a responsibility to remain relevant. Our goal is not just to present classical symphonic programmes, but to be representative of the diversity that surrounds us.”

Darwin Symphony Orchestra

The majestic red rock will serve as a backdrop to the evening concert in October, with what Wood describes as a diverse programme, ranging from music inspired by Australian indigenous culture through to Romantic Italian opera.

Joining the orchestra will be Opera Australia’s lyric soprano, Emma Matthews, and William Barton on the didgeridoo.

“My aim is not just to improve the orchestra and to develop its playing and quality, but to make the orchestra emblematic of the Territory and what it stands for,” he adds.

“I look forward to the challenges and excitement of bringing classical music to the people of the NT and beyond.”

The Uluru DSO concert will take place 18 and 19 October and is described by the group as a “once in a lifetime opportunity”.

The conditions were perfect and the beach was packed with spectators hoping to witness fantastic surfing. Having both great weather and waves for the finals was an added bonus for all the top surfers in the country who entered the event.

Russell Winter, two-times UK Pro Surf Tour champion, took the Sundried Open National title and was followed by Gordon Fontaine, from Bournemouth. Third place went to an inform Newquay surfer Mark Harris and fourth to Louis Eyre.

The English National Surf Championship is one of Europe’s longest running surfing competitions, where some of the best surfers in the country compete for the title of English Champion and selection to the English team for the European Surfing Championships.

In the other divisions there were many standout performances. Keshia Eyre won the Disco Beads Women’s division in decisive fashion. In the Zumbatastic Men’s Longboard, a world class performance was put in by Ben Skinner as he dominated over his fellow competitors in the final.  The Zumbatastic Women’s final was taken out by Charlotte Bayliss.

The Senior and Veteran divisions were won by two Newquay Lifeguards, James Mitchell and Mark Oliver, the Masters by South Devon based Martin Connelly. This year’s Randall Davies Trophy went to the event Head Judge Mike Durkin for all the work he has put in over the last year.

2013 English National Surf Championships:

Open:
1. Russell Winter
2. Gordon Fontaine
3. Mark Harris
4. Luis Eyre

Womens:
1. Keshia Eyre
2. Emily Currie
3. Gabi Rowe
4. Hannah Harding

Longboard:
1. Ben Skinner
2. Adam Griffiths
3. Ben Haworth
4. Zack Lawton

Seniors:
1. James Mitchell
2. Sean Harris
3. Paul Kirby
4. Martin Connolly
5. Matt Harwood